Recent Projects and Renderings

As the holiday season gets into full swing here in the States, we are wrapping up some private projects, studio designs and renderings for other designers.  Everybody likes hand renderings so I will share some of the more interesting rooms we have been working on.

First up is a difficult kitchen space for our good friends in California.  This is a stunning house, but with an odd shape to the kitchen which took some clever design to get organized.  The designers moved some doors and windows around to get a better spatial flow to the room.  We didn’t do much here, other than render the design.  Cabinets are SieMatic Classic, in Sterling Grey gloss lacquer.

California Kitchen Rendering by Mick Ricereto

Next up is a more eclectic design in a very traditional house in South Carolina.  The client wanted something darker and more modern in this – again – difficult-shaped kitchen space.  We helped add some character to the room by designing a banquette and treating the existing brick wall with a Silestone wainscoting to tie the kitchen finishes and the architecture together.  I could completely see myself sipping coffee by the window on a nice spring morning.

Umber Gloss Lacquer Eclectic KitchenThis next project was a rendering for a real estate developer in Florida.  This is a small kitchen, but using the same care we use on our big design projects.  Where prospective home buyers would normally expect a basic digital rendering of the space, we like to think this accessorized and inviting view gives a better impression of the builder’s product.

Small Kitchen Rendering by Mick Ricereto

This next project are renderings for a villa in Hawaii.  The designers were looking to update the traditional Japanese-style interior to a more minimalist and clean look, while retaining the incredible inside-outside living that is unique to this climate.  First is the great room, with a view to the dining table and sitting area.  The kitchen is behind the camera in this view.

Hawaii Resort Interior RenderingThe floor here is slate, which continues inside and out seamlessly.  The sliding doors are shown here pocketed; there is almost no divider between the outdoors and in.  The next view is the bathroom, which has an open arrangement to allow a great view from the bathtub.

Hawaii Resort Bathroom RenderingThe bedroom has a similar set of sliding doors to the outside.  The piece on the wall is a Donald Judd-style wall sculpture.

Hawaii Resort Bedroom Rendering by Mick RiceretoBack to kitchens, here is our third prize winning entry to the Blanco Dream Kitchen contest from this past October.  The rules required the fitting of a Blanco sink and faucet (which we use extensively in most of our projects), but otherwise the design and style of one’s entry was completely open for creativity.  Our design is a very modern and modest kitchen using grey woods, stainless steel and for the room’s centerpiece, a black Corian custom angled island.  Our Ilex Space Array chandelier in black is above the sink/eating area, and this finish ties in to the blackened oak tall cabinets/room divider to the right.

Modern Kitchen Concept by Mick RiceretoI like how our Blanco project resembles the Hawaii resort above.  The lifestyle is not dissimilar, although our space is in a North American urban area; the desire to bring the outdoors in is an almost universal request when designing living spaces today.

The Blanco contest results can be seen in this issue of Blanco’s online magazine Here

The next project is a rendering for our colleagues in California, a kitchen for an industry executive.  We worked carefully on the proportions of these upper cabinets as the ceiling is a bit low and we didn’t want to misrepresent the design by making it appear taller than it actually is.  Hand rendering of course should be considered an “artist’s impression”, but that doesn’t mean we should not strive for accuracy in the design.

SieMatic Beaux Arts Class Kitchen Rendering by Mick RiceretoThis last project was done earlier in the autumn; a nice big traditional kitchen for our friends again in South Carolina.  This is an expertly-tailored space with some very nice door details.  Again, another kitchen with a lot of openings and a tricky space to design but I think the room comes together with an exquisite use of vertical proportions and a consistent horizontal datum.

SieMatic Classic Beaux Arts Kitchen Rendering by Mick Ricereto

In addition to these residential renderings we have some private kitchens and as usual, kitchen studio projects and other retail spaces on our boards.  2015 has been a busy year here in our new Philadelphia studio.  We look forward to some relaxation time this holiday season and continued growth for 2016.  Thanks for visiting the blog and please also see our Facebook page Here for photos, travel impressions and general goings-on at Mick Ricereto Interior + Product Design.

 

 

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New Projects 2014 – SieMatic Charleston

It’s been 5 years since we completed the original installation for SieMatic Charleston.  That showroom won us the Kitchen & Bath Business magazine Showroom of the Year award for 2009 (Link to KB&B Article).  However five years is a long time in the luxury furniture industry, and innovators should be prepared to change out a display every 1-2 years to maintain authority over trends in materials and design.  SieMatic NYC and Charleston are good illustrations of this thinking.

The Charleston design team was fortunate to have sold off some old displays just as new product was coming out of Germany, so we were able to do the latest here.  This first display, in the front window, is very modern in layout with a long rectangular island in Agate grey lacquer and natural walnut.

SieMatic Agate Grey Display

The geometry is as simple as possible, with as little clutter we could devise.  The hood is a ceiling mounted unit and cooktop a flush-mounted induction, to keep the furniture sleek and less “kitcheny”.  The long countertops are in a ceramic material which replicates basalt, but to a length of over 300cm.  There is really no reason to consider natural stone in place of this incredibly strong, impervious and eco-friendly material.  From arm’s distance you cannot tell this is a manufactured material.  This countertop is a SieMatic exclusive, and comes in several colors and finishes.

Note how the pullout cabinets have no hardware, and the faces go to the floor.  The cabinets open with electronic “touch latches”, a hugely popular trend with European kitchen design today.

This display replaced another long island layout, but retained the fireplace area towards the front window.  We softened the look by removing the TV and taking the bookmatched/sequenced walnut panels up to 9 feet.  The glossy panels on the backsplash are SieMatic Graphite lacquer.

The original Beaux Arts display remains in the sister window slot.  With this look very appropriate to the South and with the recessed white panel design being timeless as ever, there is no need to change this display any time soon.

SieMatic Beaux Arts Display

We installed a new “Sophia Loren” Beaux Arts Lotus White Gloss kitchen 2 years ago, and it remains as is.  It is interesting to see how the Beaux Arts feel has changed over the past few years, with just these two displays in one location showing the depth of range one “doorstyle” can go.  It is very much about overall feel and appointments, and not the design of the cabinet door.

Beaux Arts 2.0 Sophia Loren

We also changed a smaller display in the back, which represents an “apartment kitchen”.  Although we are starting to move away from doing smaller displays like this, it is good to show SieMatic can meet smaller budgets and still deliver world-class function and style.  This display is in laminate and the price of such a design is more accessible than many would surmise.  Such is a benefit of modular German cabinetry, having all the interior quality and function but choose laminate for the finish and be practical and budget-minded at once.

SieMatic SC10 laminate Floating Spaces display

The shelving system is called Floating Spaces, and is completely adjustable in height.  Although we carefully composed the standard widths and shelf placement, it is designed to be flexible.  The seating is a small banquette, as large as space would allow.  This is composed simply of laminate panel material.  I love banquettes and in fact, if I had one at home I would be sitting in it typing this right now.

The last display also contains some Floating Spaces, integrated into a series called S2.  This is SieMatic’s “channel” series, of handle-less cabinets.  SieMatic invented the handle-free design of kitchen cabinets in 1960, and this look is exceptionally popular today.

SieMatic Sterling grey gloss laminate display

The finishes are Titan oak (a limed quartersawn veneer) and Sterling grey “similacque” laminate.  This gloss laminate is so flat and distortion-free, it looks just like lacquer.  I understand it is coated with a clear gloss so in fact it is really a paint finish on top of laminate, and the clarity is just simply remarkable.  Combined with the “Zero” edge of the door, there really isn’t anything else that compares.

We are very happy with this display but I should remark how I miss the design we replaced, if only because of the Photoshop work I had to do documenting it.  The old display in Terra Brown gloss lacquer, from my main website at mickdesign.com :

Old SieMatic display at Charleston

At the time of installation, I had only a 35mm wide lens and this display was very wide, requiring me to do a panoramic stitch-type edit.  This was before easy stitch-type apps were available, where you just follow directions on the screen … so I had to take several manual pans and edit them later.  It was grueling.  So, in support of manual craftsmanship, this old display photo shall take one last victory lap around the internet in honor of midnight photo edit-efforts around the world.

As always, working with SieMatic is a great honor and I’m looking forward to the next round of showrooms this year and beyond.  Have a look at my Facebook page for more news and links to exciting design projects.

Charleston and Middleton Plantation

SieMatic held its annual sales meeting in Charleston SC this past weekend.  Readers may recall my Kitchen & Bath Business Magazine award-winning showroom design for SieMatic Charleston (read about it here and here).  There was a great crowd attending with SieMatic dealers from all over the USA and Canada.  After presentations from noted kitchen designer Mick DeGiulio and interiors photographer Evan Joseph of Architectural Digest fame, we took in some nice weather at the plantation.

Middleton Oak near Charleston, SC

This is the Middleton Oak, a Quercus virginiana (Live oak) looking over the Ashley River.  This is the largest single-stem Live oak in the southern US states and although it has declined a bit in recent years, it is still impressive.  Live oaks tend to have copious amounts of Spanish moss draping their limbs and the Middleton oaks deliver:

Live Oaks with Spanish Moss

After a couple of days of dodgy weather, it was about 60 degrees during our tour – perfect for strolling the grounds before our afternoon meeting wrap-up.  The sun brought out a small alligator to the shores of a pond and a lovely peacock browsing some grass right near a pathway.  This peacock went his (her?) way and was not bothered by our presence in the slightest.  We wanted it to spread it’s tail and make a big show but he (she?) seemed content with us snapping away with our cameras.

Peacock at Middleton Plantation

The spring house bathed in early March morning sun.

Spring Pond at Middleton

 

On the second floor of the spring house is a tiny chapel.  The stark white interior was a wonderfully restful little space.

Middleton Chapel Detail

Part of our group at the highest point of the plantation, looking out over the Ashley River.

Middleton Plantation

My friends Beverly and Keith Binns (of premier kitchen and bath studio Binns in Toronto, Ontario), posing in front of the main plantation house.  Note the Flemish design of the house; Henry Middleton toured Europe with his new bride and came back with fresh inspiration for his new home.

Beverly and Keith Binns at Middleton Plantation

Another massive Live oak, this one a “twin”, as opposed to a single-stem specimen.

Live Oak at Middleton

Notice the sandy soil.  We wondered if this was so bare due to the shade of the tree, or something in the soil.  With the moss and leaves covering the ground and changing the ph, maybe natural ground cover just can’t get a good start in this soil.

During another break in the conference, I took a quick walk down King Street in the center of town and went through the campus of Charleston College looking for more nice old trees and buildings.  Some scenes from the campus grounds:

Charleston College Building

A lovely old gatehouse at the bottom of the old quad:

Gatehouse at Charleston College

It was very quiet, so I think it was spring break.  Here is an unusual white-painted wood structure with great classical detail on the edge of campus.

White Charleston Building

I love the subtle contrast between bright white trim and the dove-colored siding.  This last shot is the head house at the ancient market square.  I ventured down the road a bit just to re-visit this building.  The coloring is very interesting to me, being used to red brick and white trim Federal buildings of Philadelphia and Baltimore, and the Beaux Arts marble and limestone of Washington and New York.

Market Building Facade

It is always great to attend these events and see dear old friends and catch new design inspiration.  I will most certainly be back to Charleston, since I have business here once a year or so.  Good thing, as I was reminded of another plantation called Drayton Hall, which is not far from the city.  I’ll have to make time to get back for that one, and a more comprehensive tour of the Charleston Singles and other unique structures of the enchanting old city.

SieMatic Charleston Renovations

The SieMatic showroom in Charleston, SC had a re-opening event last week after I directed the redesign of two display areas.  With new product out in Germany, the company wanted to change two small displays for the newest ideas.  Of primary importance was the sparkling Beaux Arts 2 product, an elegant combination of framed doors and modern appointments.  Here are some pictures from the opening party:

Image

The display is a smaller iteration of the display we did in New York last autumn.  The original, in Germany (and also shown at Euro Cucine in Milano last week) was said to be inspired by the natural beauty and elegance of Sophia Loren.  This particular display is very on-trend; a wonderful combination of smart and clean design with bright metal, glossy lacquers and enough classically-inspired glamour to make it appealing to more traditional-minded clients.

SieMatic Beaux Art 2 in Charleson, SC

Above is a shot from the factory in Germany (search for my previous post on “SieMatic Haus Fair” for more details).  The white Ceasarstone is color-matched to the “Lotus White” gloss lacquer of the cabinets.  We did a custom-pattern Bizazza mosaic on the cooking wall.  The glass cabinets above have polished nickel frames.

Beaux Arts 2 Display at SieMatic Charleston

The cooking wall is comprised of S2 base cabinets, without handles.  This contrasts with the island and sink wall, which are done with SE2002BAL (and nickel handles).  I am not going to show the back of the island; it’s a goof-up.  It looks too sparse as I specified the S2 plain lacquer panel instead of fielded-style panels.  It would have looked nice with another set of faux drawers on the back like a giant commode.  Lesson learned.

SieMatic SC10 Display at Charleston Showroom

The display above is also new.  A small L-shape with a built-in banquette (sadly, I have no pictures of the opposite wall), designed as a small “condo kitchen”.  The handles are integrated into the tops of the doors/drawers.  I am not personally enamored of this feature but it was requested.  When I get a good picture of the banquette I designed maybe I will put together a post of just built-in kitchen seating that I have done and admired around the world.  I love built-in kitchen seating; its where I spend at least an hour-a-day in my own house.

Some party scenes from the opening:

Opening Event at SieMatic Charleston

Regional Manager and Market Development Director Marcia Speer with a guest:

SieMatic Charleston

A bustling crowd at the opening event:

SieMatic Charleston

If you find yourself in Charleston, SC, have a stop in to see the showroom.  The address is 444 King Street.  I love visiting the city; a few hours walking in Charleston is not something to miss out on.  There is talk of another event later this year where I will present on some design trends.  I look forward to another visit.